Please find enclosed the Feasibility Study into the damming of the Blue River as requested. The report discusses in detail the findings of the study for your perusal. It is our belief that discussions about the proposed dam should be given a high priority at the next planning meeting scheduled for 12 January 2009. Yours faithfully

Critically assess the employment relations issues that were identified in the industrial dispute between the Australasian Meat Industry Employees’ Union and Teys Australia (Beenleigh) in 2013 and 2014. Information relating to the assignment will be placed on the “news”, “Q&A” and “general discussion” forums and will continue to be placed on these forums as requested and required.

  1. explain and discuss some of the theories of employment relations;
  2. discuss and assess the role of governments, unions and employers in the system of employment relations in Australia;
  3. identify and critically evaluate the changes in the Australian labour market;
  4. discuss the impact of legislation on the practice of employment relations in Australia; and
  5. identify and critically evaluate the most important issues that impact on the practice of employment relations in Australia.

Journal article more than 10.

 

 

Report Writing

 

A report is a formal written document providing technical information and informed opinion relating to a specific task.

Reports are written for a variety of purposes. Different types of reports include:

  • business reports
  • financial reports
  • feasibility studies
  • technical reports
  • laboratory reports
  • health and safety reports
  • case study reports.

Reports are considered to be legal documents in the workplace, and must be accurate and concise in order to avoid misinterpretation.

A report is broken into sections and subsections, each of which has a heading.

A report may include the following:

  • letter of transmittal
  • title page
  • abstract or executive summary
  • table of contents
  • table of figures and tables
  • scope
  • introduction
  • analysis
  • lists
  • conclusion
  • recommendations
  • appendices

Source: 

Dwyer, J 2009, The Business Communication Handbook, 8th edn, Pearson Education, Frenchs Forest.

 

Letter of Transmittal – Report

 

Example:

1 January 2009

The Planning Committee

Kalkadoo Shire Council

PO Box 102

Kalkadoo Qld 4830

Dear Councillors

Please find enclosed the Feasibility Study into the damming of the Blue River as requested. The report discusses in detail the findings of the study for your perusal. It is our belief that discussions about the proposed dam should be given a high priority at the next planning meeting scheduled for 12 January 2009.

Yours faithfully

Jane Brown John Black

Jane Brown and John Black

Environmental Engineers

Source: 

Learning Skills Unit n.d., Report Writing, viewed 24 October 2013

 

Abstract – Report

 

An abstract or synopsis summarises briefly (150-200 words), the findings of the entire report.

It usually contains:

  • the aim or purpose
  • methodology (procedures followed)
  • the main findings
  • conclusion.

The abstract does not include the report’s recommendations.

: The abstract is NOT the introduction.

This report discusses the feasibility study carried out from 12 June 2001 to 7 December 2001 into the damming of the Blue River between Johnson’s Creek and Blackstump Creek. Water flow rates, sediment levels, fish stock numbers, weed infiltration rates and salinity tests have been carried out and positive conclusions have been drawn. It should be noted that areas flooded by the proposed dam include only those areas already declared unusable for agricultural purposes. It is expected that economic opportunities for a fishery, council caravan park, irrigation leases and household water meter reservoirs will be forthcoming within twelve months of the dam’s completion.

Source: 

Learning Skills Unit n.d., Report Writing, viewed 24 October 2013

 

Table of contents – Report

 

A table of contents shows the reader where the various sections of the report are located.

It is written on a separate page.

It includes the page numbers of each section within the report and any appendices that are attached to the report.

It does not include the title page, abstract or executive summary. These sections are attached to the report before the table of contents page.

This is a very simple example of a table of contents. More detailed examples can be found in the Faculty of Business and Informatics Guide for Students.

 

 

Scope – Report

 

In a general sense, scope means”‘the extent of the area or subject matter that something deals with” (The Oxford Dictionary of English).

The scope of a report therefore shows what it includes and excludes.

It outlines the aims and limitations of the report.

This business plan examines investment opportunities for XYZ Holdings over the next 12 months. It will not consider previous investment strategies or comment on the performance of current or former investment consultants.

Source:

‘Scope noun’ 2005, in C Soanes & A Stevenson (eds),The Oxford Dictionary of English(rev. edn), viewed 19 December 2011,

Analysis – Report

Analysis means a ‘detailed examination of the elements or structure of something’ (Oxford Reference Online).

In a report, the topic must be examined from different perspectives in order to build up a comprehensive picture.

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